Chew Food to a Liquid


Less food, more chew
— Chinese proverb

What you eat is important – it defines a lot of what you are made of.
But how you assimilate food is of the utmost importance.

THE IMPACT ON FLAVOR

  • Food has flavor only when in the mouth. The longer it stays in the mouth, the more flavor is released and the more enjoyment can be extracted from it. The stomach does not have taste buds.
  • Once the food is in the stomach, the pleasure of eating stops and the digestion process begins.
  • Taste buds can only be in contact with the surface of the food. What is inside a morsel will not give any sensation whatsoever. Chewing increases the surface of the food, freeing more flavor.
  • Chewing more requires less food to reach the same level of pleasure.

THE IMPACT ON SATIETY

  • The digestive system receptors take about 20 minutes to register what has been ingested. Until then, the brain does not really know how much has been eaten. By eating too fast, you are still hungry for more when in fact you may have already ingested enough to sustain your energy needs.
  • Chewing longer slows down the process of eating, thus reaching satiety with less food.

THE IMPACT ON DIGESTION

  • Digestion is a combination of chemical and mechanical processes.
  • The churning action of the stomach muscles physically breaks down the food
  • Some acids and enzymes are released to break down food particles
  • Now, consider this simple physical fact: Smaller objects have a larger surface compared to large objects
    see annex below

    • Say the stomach, senses a certain volume of food, that requires 8 droplets of gastric acid.
    • If they meet 8 little morsels of food, they do their job just fine.
    • But if they meet one big morsel, only 4 droplets will wrap around it and the other 4 will give you acid reflux.
  • Moreover, the big morsel will only be partially broken down, leaving undigested food to enter the intestine track, where it will putrefy, inviting to digestive troubles.

A practical guide to finding happiness

  • How to start your own personal practice
  • The roadblocks on your path to happiness
  • How your mind naturally works against you
  • How to make your mind work for you
  • Plus, more about Georges' personal journey

THE IMPACT ON STRESS

  • Brain 3 is the cradle of stress. It is constantly wandering and lives in a different spacetime than current reality. Stress is created when imagined things do not meet actual reality.
  • Consciously chewing allows Brain 2, the peaceful brain, to be more active, thus lessening the activity of Brain 3, the stress generator.

THE IMPACT ON CHOICES OF FOOD

  • Processed food contains a lot of harsh compounds that cannot be detected when quickly swallowed.
  • Chewing more make these abrasive chemicals more active, leaving a very unpleasant aftertaste.
  • It does not take long to prefer more natural food

YOUR CHEWING PRACTICE

  • Start easy, chew at least 4 times before swallowing
  • Then increase to 7 times
  • Then increase to 20 times
  • Then chew food to a liquid

HELPFUL TRICKS

  • Take smaller bites in mouth
  • Refrain from prepping your next bite
  • Put down silverware while chewing
  • Keep your hands empty of food
  • Wait until your mouth is empty to drink
  • Wait until your mouth is empty to talk

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BONUS TRICK: CHEW WHAT YOU DRINK

  • This is what professional tasters do to assess wine
  • Keep liquid, drinks or soup, longer in the mouth.
    Let them roll around at least 3 times before swallowing them slowly.

Happy Practice!

 

 

ANNEX

Smaller objects have a larger surface compared to large object.

Food

Qty

Size

Volume

Surface

Big Morsel

1

2 in

8 cu in

24 sq in

Small Morsels

8

1 in

8 cu in

48 sq in

Eight smaller pieces of food (a big chunk chewed up 4 times) are twice more exposed to the action of gastric acid. No residual gastric acid is left to create heartburns.

Sort of related Fun Fact.
Although they are both composed of bone and flesh, mice and elephants do not fall the same way.

A mouse can fall from a height twenty times her size and be fine. An elephant would crash falling down three feet.

Although the pull from gravity is the same on small and large weights, the ratio air resistance/gravity pull is one hundred times greater in the mouse than in the elephant.

By using a parachute, sky-divers are simply increasing their surface (air resistance) without increasing their weight (pull from gravity).